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Getting around

Traveling by public transit in Copenhagen with a pet dog

Copenhagen kindly provides an official tourist site for the city, called VisitCopenhagen — so valuable for those of us who struggle with Danish. Its section on public transport sketches out the options: A-buses, colored red & yellow, operate around the clock, and are supplemented during part of the day by the blue & yellow S-buses (which have fewer stops); the metro currently has two lines (a third is being constructed), and is, among other things, a splendid way to reach the city from the  … Read more

Traveling by public transit (and train) in and around Madrid with a pet dog

This post was triggered by an article I ran across applauding the Madrid subway system’s recent decision to eliminate fees for pets. (Buen trabajo, Madrid!) I’ve since learned that Madrid’s public transit system, including metro trains, buses, and cercanías local rail, is vast. High time, therefore, to include it in Dog Jaunt’s list of public transit pet policies. Here’s what I’ve found:

Madrid’s metro system (as always, I give you the general link first, and then follow up with the pet policy — which gets  … Read more

Traveling by public transit (and train) in and around Rome with a pet dog

Put briefly, your pet dog need only be leashed and muzzled to travel on Rome’s public transit, but there is a fee. Broadening the focus beyond Rome, small pets in carriers travel for free on Trenitalia regional and long-distance trains, while there is a fee for larger dogs. We haven’t been back to Rome since Chloe walked (or, rather, wiggled — she was very small) into our lives. I suspect that, as in Paris, the rules provide a general framework for  … Read more

Traveling by public transit in Montréal and Québec City with a small dog

At the top of my list of two-week vacation ideas is a road trip down the Hudson River, starting much farther north, in Québec City and Montréal, then dawdling from Saratoga Springs to New York City. The foreseeable future doesn’t include two free weeks, however, so I’m channeling my energies into planning and researching. I’m delighted to report that travelers with small pets have a wealth of public transit options in both Montréal and Québec City — how nice to be able  … Read more

Pet taxi for travel between the U.K. and France

I made a note of this on Dog Jaunt’s Facebook page, but posts there soon scroll out of view, and it would be a shame to lose track of such a useful tidbit of info: One of Dog Jaunt’s Facebook followers turns out to be a taxi service based in Folkestone, a city which is, among other things, at the U.K. end of the Channel tunnel. The Folkestone Taxi Company is ready and willing to drive you and your dog from France  … Read more

Guest post: Traveling with Holly the Cairn Terrier across Latin America

Normally, I don’t accept guest posts — partly because I don’t want to betray your trust (there’s too much advertising masquerading as content out there) and partly because I like to maintain a consistent “sound” for the blog — but when I heard from Tamara Murray, I knew it was time to make an exception.

Tamara writes a travel blog of her own, called Our Leap Year, about the year-long adventure she and her husband and Holly, their 15 year-old Cairn  … Read more

Traveling by B.C. Ferries with a pet dog

Over the past week, we’ve taken several ferry rides on B.C. Ferries, ranging from a quick hop on the tiny Skeena Queen (connecting Fulford Harbor, on Salt Spring Island, with Swartz Bay) to a long chug on the Spirit of Vancouver Island (one of the massive ferries connecting Swartz Bay and Tsawwassen). Pet dogs are allowed on board, though not above the car decks. The B.C. Ferries web site is austerely brief on the topic: “Pets must remain on vehicle  … Read more

Vancouver, B.C. public transit with a pet: Sightseeing by bus, SkyTrain, and SeaBus

My grandfather, an otherwise elegant man, was a devoted fan of sightseeing buses. He acknowledged their faults, but insisted that there is no better way to get an overview of a new city, its history, and its main attractions. In time, I learned to agree. A bus, moreover, is a great alternative for tourists on soggy days, or as a break when you’ve walked your feet into stumps. Here’s the problem, though: While some hop-on, hop-off bus companies allow you to board  … Read more

Dog jaunt: Another piece of Vancouver B.C.’s seawall, then back by bus

I finally fell in love with Vancouver, B.C. in 2011, when Chloe and I came to town on our own for a travel bloggers’ conference. A born introvert, I skipped the beginning of the conference for a ferry ride to Granville Island and a long walk with Chloe along the seawall around False Creek. Three years later, we’re back in town, and our hotel is right across the street from the conference center — and the beginning of the seawall.

Here’s  … Read more

Taking a dog into, and out of, England on the Eurotunnel Le Shuttle

A quick recap for those of you who are just arriving at Dog Jaunt: I added a week to our month-long trip to Paris because I wanted to have the experience of taking Chloe into, and out of, England via the Eurotunnel Le Shuttle.

Why make the effort? You are not allowed to fly into the U.K. with an in-cabin pet, so people who prefer to travel within arm’s reach of their dog have to be creative: One of the options, as  … Read more